Quarterly report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d)

Basis of Presentation and Accounting Policies (Policies)

v3.19.1
Basis of Presentation and Accounting Policies (Policies)
3 Months Ended
Mar. 31, 2019
Basis Of Presentation And Accounting Policies [Abstract]  
Consolidation

The condensed consolidated financial statements include the accounts of SEACOR Marine Holdings Inc. and its consolidated subsidiaries (the “Company”). In the opinion of management, all adjustments (consisting of normal recurring adjustments) have been made to fairly present the unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements for the periods indicated.  Results of operations for the interim periods presented are not necessarily indicative of operating results for the full year or any future periods.

Certain information and footnote disclosures normally included in financial statements prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States have been condensed or omitted. These condensed consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with the Company’s financial statements and related notes thereto included in the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2018.   

Unless the context otherwise indicates, any reference in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q to the “Company” refers to SEACOR Marine Holdings Inc. and its consolidated subsidiaries and any reference in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q to “SEACOR Marine” refers to SEACOR Marine Holdings Inc. without its consolidated subsidiaries. 

Recently Adopted Accounting Standards

Recently Adopted Accounting Standards.

On February 25, 2016, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued a comprehensive new leasing standard, ASC 842, meant to improve transparency and comparability among companies by requiring lessees to recognize a lease liability and a corresponding lease asset for virtually all lease contracts.  It also requires additional disclosures about leasing arrangements.  The Company adopted the new standard on January 1, 2019 and applied the transition provisions of the new standard with recognition of a cumulative-effect adjustment to the opening balance of retained earnings and therefore the Company was not required to recast previously issued financial statements. The Company elected the available practical expedients permitted under the guidance including the ability to carry forward the existing lease classification, the option to not separate lease and non-lease components in calculating the right-of-use assets and corresponding lease liabilities and to not apply the recognition requirements of Topic 842 to short-term leases (leases that have a duration of twelve months or less at lease inception). For some leases, it was not possible for the Company to determine the interest rate implicit in each of its operating leases and therefore used the Company’s incremental borrowing rate in calculating operating lease right-of-use assets and lease liabilities.  The Company included renewal options that were reasonably certain of being exercised in determining the lease term.  Upon adoption, the Company recorded $33.7 million of right-of-use assets, $31.9 million in lease liabilities, and a cumulative-effect adjustment to the opening balance of retained earnings of $1.7 million for certain of the Company’s equipment, office and land leases.  In addition, unamortized deferred gains for four vessels previously accounted for under sale-leaseback arrangements of $8.7 million, ($11.0 million deferred gains net of $2.3 million deferred taxes), were fully recognized as an adjustment to the opening balance of retained earnings.

 

In February 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-02, “Income Statement—Reporting Comprehensive Income (Topic 220): Reclassification of Certain Tax Effects from Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income” (“ASU 2018-02”). The amendments in ASU 2018-02 permit a reclassification from Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (“AOCI”) to retained earnings for stranded tax effects resulting from the Tax Cuts & Jobs Act (“TCJA”). Consequently, the amendments eliminate the stranded tax effects resulting from the Tax Act and will improve the usefulness of information reported to financial statement users. ASU 2018-02 is effective for the Company for annual and interim reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2018. For the period ending March 31, 2019, an election has not been made to reclassify the income tax effects of the TCJA from AOCI to retained earnings.

 

In June 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-07, a new accounting standard which addresses aspects of the accounting for nonemployee share-based payment transactions.  The standard is effective for interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2018.  The adoption of the new standard by the Company did not have a material impact on its consolidated financial position or its results of operations and cash flows.

Revenue Recognition

Critical Accounting Policies.

Revenue Recognition. Revenue is recognized when (or as) the Company transfers promised goods or services to its customers in amounts that reflect the consideration to which the Company expects to be entitled to in exchange for those goods or services, which occurs when (or as) the Company satisfies its contractual obligations and transfers over control of the promised goods or services to its customers. Costs to obtain or fulfill a contract are expensed as incurred.

Lease Revenues. The Company’s lease revenues are primarily from time charters and bareboat charters that are recognized ratably over the lease term as services are provided, typically on a per day basis. The charterer will take the vessel on hire for a specific period of time, use the vessel to move cargo, people or equipment and will pay the Company the agreed upon rate per day. Under a time charter the Company provides a vessel to a customer for a set term and the Company is responsible for all operating expenses, typically excluding fuel. Under a bareboat charter, the Company provides a vessel to a customer for a set term and the customer assumes responsibility for all operating expenses, including fuel, and the risk of operation (see Note 14).

Revenues from Customers of Management Servicers. The Company contracts with various customers to carry out management services for vessels as agents for and on behalf of ship owners.  These services include crew management, technical management, commercial management, insurance arrangements, sale and purchase of vessel, provisions and bunkering. As manager, the Company undertakes to use its best endeavors to provide the agreed management services as agents for, and on behalf of the ship owners in accordance with sound ship management practice and to protect and promote the interest of the owners in all matters relating to the provision of the agreed upon management services. The Company also contracts with various customers to carry out management services regarding engineering for vessel construction and vessel conversions. The vast majority of the ship management agreements have a duration of one to three years and are typically billed on a monthly basis. The Company satisfies its performance obligation over the term of the contract, and therefore recognizes revenue over the term of the contract while related costs are expensed as incurred (see Note 14).

Revenue that does not meet the aforementioned criteria is deferred until the criteria is met and are considered contract liabilities. Contract liabilities which are included in other current liabilities in the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets, for the three months ended March 31 were as follows (in thousands):

 

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

Balance at beginning of period

 

$

1,327

 

 

$

10,104

 

Revenues deferred during the period

 

 

3,409

 

 

 

875

 

Revenues recognized during the period

 

 

(1,135

)

 

 

(1,550

)

Balance at end of period

 

$

3,601

 

 

$

9,429

 

 

As of March 31, 2019, contract liabilities include $2.0 million related to the time charter of an offshore support vessel to a customer for which collection was not reasonably assured. The Company will recognize revenues when collected or when collection is reasonably assured. All costs and expenses related to this charter were recognized as incurred.

As of March 31, 2019, the Company has deferred $1.4 million received as reimbursement for upgrades of a vessel and deferred reservation fees. The amount will be recognized in revenues over time, commencing with the start of the new time charter agreement for the vessel.

The remaining balance of $0.2 million as of March 31, 2019 is comprised of contract liabilities to two customers for which collection is not reasonably assured.

Property and Equipment

Property and Equipment. Equipment, stated at cost, is depreciated using the straight-line method over the estimated useful life of the asset to an estimated salvage value. With respect to each class of asset, the estimated useful life is based upon a newly built asset being placed into service and represents the time period beyond which it is typically not justifiable for the Company to continue to operate the asset in the same or similar manner. From time to time, the Company may acquire older assets that have already exceeded the Company’s useful life policy, in which case the Company depreciates such assets based on its best estimate of remaining useful life, typically the next survey or certification date.

As of March 31, 2019, the estimated useful life (in years) of each of the Company’s major categories of new equipment was as follows:

 

Offshore Support Vessels:

 

 

Crew transfer vessels

 

10

All other offshore support vessels (excluding crew transfer vessels)

 

20

 

Equipment maintenance and repair costs and the costs of routine overhauls, drydockings and inspections performed on vessels and equipment are charged to operating expense as incurred. Expenditures that extend the useful life or improve the marketing and commercial characteristics of equipment as well as major renewals and improvements to other properties are capitalized.

 

Certain interest costs incurred during the construction of equipment are capitalized as part of the assets’ carrying values and are amortized over such assets’ estimated useful lives. During the three months ended March 31, 2019, capitalized interest totaled $0.4 million.

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets and 50% or Less Owned Companies

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets. The Company performs an impairment analysis of long-lived assets used in operations, including intangible assets, when indicators of impairment are present. These indicators may include a significant decrease in the market price of a long-lived asset or asset group, a significant adverse change in the extent or manner in which a long-lived asset or asset group is being used or in its physical condition, or a current period operating or cash flow loss combined with a history of operating or cash flow losses or a forecast that demonstrates continuing losses associated with the use of a long-lived asset or asset group. If the carrying values of the assets are not recoverable, as determined by the estimated undiscounted cash flows, the estimated fair value of the assets or asset groups are compared to their current carrying values and impairment charges are recorded if the carrying value exceeds fair value. The Company performs its testing on an asset or asset group basis. Generally, fair value is determined using valuation techniques, such as expected undiscounted cash flows or appraisals, as appropriate. During the three months ended March 31, 2019, the Company did not recognize any impairment charges related to its long-lived assets.  During the three months ended March 31, 2018, the Company recognized $2.9 million of impairment charges related to four anchor-handling vessels removed from service and adjusted to scrap value.

Impairment of 50% or Less Owned Companies. Investments in 50% or less owned companies are reviewed periodically to assess whether there is an other-than-temporary decline in the carrying value of the investment. In its evaluation, the Company considers, among other items, recent and expected financial performance and returns, impairments recorded by the investee and the capital structure of the investee. When the Company determines the estimated fair value of an investment is below carrying value and the decline is other-than-temporary, the investment is written down to its estimated fair value. Actual results may vary from the Company’s estimates due to the uncertainty regarding projected financial performance, the severity and expected duration of declines in value and the available liquidity in the capital markets to support the continuing operations of the investee, among other factors. Although the Company believes its assumptions and estimates are reasonable, the investee’s actual performance compared with the estimates could produce different results and lead to additional impairment charges in future periods. During the three months ended March 31, 2019, the Company did not recognize any impairment charges related to its 50% or less owned companies.  During the three months ended March 31, 2018, the Company recognized impairment charges of $1.2 million related to one of its 50% or less owned companies which the Company believed was unable to meet all of its liabilities.

Income Taxes

Income Taxes. During the three months ended March 31, 2019, the Company's effective income tax rate of 13.4% was primarily due to taxes provided on income attributable to noncontrolling interests, foreign sourced income not subject to U.S. income taxes, and foreign taxes not creditable against U.S. income taxes. During the three months ended March 31, 2018, the Company’s effective income tax rate of 23.5% was primarily due to taxes not provided on income attributable to noncontrolling interests, foreign sourced income not subject to U.S. income taxes, and a reversal of an unrecognized tax benefit.

Deferred Gains

Deferred Gains. The Company has sold certain equipment to its 50% or less owned companies, entered into vessel sale-leaseback transactions with finance companies and provided seller financing on sales of its equipment to third parties and its 50% or less owned companies. In 2018, a portion of the gains realized from these transactions were deferred and recorded in deferred gains and other liabilities in the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets and were amortized in operating expenses as a reduction to rental expense. The new lease accounting pronouncement which was adopted on January 1, 2019 required the recognition of unamortized gains as a cumulative-effect adjustment to the opening balance of retained earnings.

Deferred gain activity related to these transactions for the three months ended March 31 was as follows (in thousands):

 

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

Balance at beginning of period

 

$

11,819

 

 

$

25,006

 

Amortization of deferred gains included in operating expenses as a reduction to rental expense

 

 

 

 

 

(2,009

)

Impact of adoption of new accounting standard

 

 

(11,026

)

 

 

 

Other adjustments

 

 

 

 

 

(25

)

Balance at end of period

 

$

793

 

 

$

22,972

 

 

 

Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)

Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss). The components of accumulated other comprehensive loss were as follows (in thousands):

 

 

 

SEACOR Marine Holdings Inc.

Stockholders’ Equity

 

 

Noncontrolling Interests

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Foreign

Currency

Translation

Adjustments

 

 

Derivative     Income (Losses) on Cash Flow Hedges, net

 

 

Total

 

 

Foreign

Currency

Translation

Adjustments

 

 

Derivative     Income (Losses) on Cash Flow Hedges, net

 

 

Other

Comprehensive

Income (Loss)

 

December 31, 2018

 

$

(15,472

)

 

$

(1,316

)

 

$

(16,788

)

 

$

(1,445

)

 

$

(11

)

 

 

 

 

Other comprehensive income

   (loss)

 

 

875

 

 

 

(899

)

 

 

(24

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

(24

)

Three Months Ended March

   31, 2019

 

$

(14,597

)

 

$

(2,215

)

 

$

(16,812

)

 

$

(1,445

)

 

$

(11

)

 

$

(24

)

 

Loss Per Share

 

Leases.  The Company determines if an arrangement contains a lease at the inception of a contract.  Leases with contractual terms less than twelve months are not recorded on the balance sheet and lease expense is recognized on a straight-line basis over the term of the short-term lease.  Leases with contractual terms longer than twelve months are categorized as either operating or finance, with corresponding right-of-use asset and lease liability recorded on the balance sheet.  Finance leases are generally those leases that substantially utilize or pay for the entire asset over its estimated life.  All other leases are categorized as operating leases.

 

Right-of-use assets represent the Company’s right to use an underlying asset for the lease term and lease liabilities represent the Company’s obligation to make lease payments arising from the lease.  Lease liabilities are recognized at the present value of the fixed lease payments, using an implicit discount rate if available, or if not readily available, the Company’s incremental borrowing rate.  Right-of-use assets are recognized based on the initial present value of the fixed lease payments and are tested for impairment in the same manner as long-lived assets used in operations.  When options exist to extend the lease term, terminate the lease before the contractual expiration date, or purchase the leased asset, and it is reasonably certain that these options will be exercised, the options are considered in determining the classification and measurement of the lease.  

 

Loss Per Share. Basic loss per common share of the Company is computed based on the weighted average number of common shares and warrants to purchase common shares at an exercise price of $0.01 per share (“Warrants”) issued and outstanding during the relevant periods.  The Warrants are included in the basic loss per common share because the shares issuable upon exercise of the Warrants are issuable for de minimis cash consideration and therefore not anti-dilutive.  Diluted loss per common share of the Company is computed based on the weighted average number of common shares and Warrants issued and outstanding plus the effect of other potentially dilutive securities through the application of the if-converted method that assumes all common shares have been issued and outstanding during the relevant periods pursuant to the conversion of the Convertible Senior Notes.  For the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018, diluted earnings per common share of the Company excluded 2,183,708 and 4,070,500 common shares, respectively, issuable pursuant to the Company’s Convertible Senior Notes (see Note 4) as the effect of their inclusion in the computation would be anti-dilutive.  In addition, for the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018, diluted loss per common share of the Company excluded 129,080 and 94,507 shares of restricted stock, respectively, and 791,816 and 653,700 shares of stock, respectively, issuable upon exercise of outstanding stock options as the effect of their inclusion in the computation would be anti-dilutive.

Leases

Leases.  The Company determines if an arrangement contains a lease at the inception of a contract.  Leases with contractual terms less than twelve months are not recorded on the balance sheet and lease expense is recognized on a straight-line basis over the term of the short-term lease.  Leases with contractual terms longer than twelve months are categorized as either operating or finance, with corresponding right-of-use asset and lease liability recorded on the balance sheet.  Finance leases are generally those leases that substantially utilize or pay for the entire asset over its estimated life.  All other leases are categorized as operating leases.

 

Right-of-use assets represent the Company’s right to use an underlying asset for the lease term and lease liabilities represent the Company’s obligation to make lease payments arising from the lease.  Lease liabilities are recognized at the present value of the fixed lease payments, using an implicit discount rate if available, or if not readily available, the Company’s incremental borrowing rate.  Right-of-use assets are recognized based on the initial present value of the fixed lease payments and are tested for impairment in the same manner as long-lived assets used in operations.  When options exist to extend the lease term, terminate the lease before the contractual expiration date, or purchase the leased asset, and it is reasonably certain that these options will be exercised, the options are considered in determining the classification and measurement of the lease.  

 

New Accounting Pronouncements

New Accounting Pronouncements.  In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-13, a new accounting standard which modifies the disclosure requirements related to fair value measurement.  The new guidance is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019.  The effects of this standard on our financial position or reporting is not expected to be material.

 

In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-15, a new accounting standard which provided guidance regarding the accounting for fees paid by a customer in a cloud computing arrangement (hosting arrangement).  The guidance reduces complexity for the accounting for costs of implementing a cloud computing service arrangement and aligns the requirements for capitalizing implementation costs incurred in a hosting arrangement that is a service contract with the requirements for capitalizing implementation costs incurred to develop or obtain internal-use software (and hosting arrangements that include an internal use software license). The standard is effective for interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2019.  The Company is evaluating the provisions of the standard but does not expect the adoption of the new standard to have a material impact on its consolidated financial position or its results of operations and cash flows.

 

In June 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-13, an amendment to the accounting standards which replaces the current incurred loss impairment methodology for financial assets measured at amortized cost with a methodology that reflects expected credit losses and requires consideration of a broader range of reasonable and supportable information, including forecasted information, to develop credit loss estimates.  The new standard is effective for interim periods beginning after December 15, 2019.  Early adoption is permitted for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2018.  The Company has not yet determined what impact, if any, the adoption of the new standard will have on its consolidated financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

 

Reclassification.  Certain amounts in the prior year’s condensed consolidated financial statements have been reclassified to conform to the current year presentation.  The reclassification had no impact on total assets, liabilities, or net loss.